I'm Becky Hirschfeld: actor, performer, director, paper picture artist, model, cat enthusiast . This blog contains self-promotion and other things I like.

 

http://radiovalencia.fm

LISTEN TO LAUREN AND BECKY ON RADIO VALENCIA!

decorativeindulgences:

ca. 1771-1800, [Wax anatomical figure of reclining woman, Florence, Italy]

What is odd about this model? It could be described in many ways – beautiful, exposed, sexually alluring. Is that consistent with its role as an anatomical teaching model? Should it have these qualities, or other more scientific ones? Wax anatomical models of this period had different uses for different audiences. 
In the European anatomical tradition, the standard or normative body was always male. Female bodies were studied in terms of how they differed. In practice this meant a focus on their reproductive capacities – most often they were pregnant, with a foetus as one of the removable pieces. But does this explain the model’s passive, sexualised pose? 
Female wax anatomical models were often referred to as ‘Venuses’, after the goddess of love and beauty. Reclining on silk or velvet cushions, in positions copied from works of art, they often had flowing hair and jewellery, which added nothing to their anatomical use. They served to show not just physical differences but also gender differences, as perceived in European culture at that time. A third way of understanding the model is to see the exposed body layers as a symbol of nature ‘unveiling herself’ to the medical gaze. Looking deep into the body was considered to be the route to knowledge. 
In just one model, ideas about art, anatomy, gender, flesh and knowledge were all conveyed. So it is not surprising if you have mixed reactions to the model – it was made that way.

via the Science Museum, London

Two of my main gigs are figure modeling and standardized patient-ing.  This is super interesting.

decorativeindulgences:

ca. 1771-1800, [Wax anatomical figure of reclining woman, Florence, Italy]

What is odd about this model? It could be described in many ways – beautiful, exposed, sexually alluring. Is that consistent with its role as an anatomical teaching model? Should it have these qualities, or other more scientific ones? Wax anatomical models of this period had different uses for different audiences.

In the European anatomical tradition, the standard or normative body was always male. Female bodies were studied in terms of how they differed. In practice this meant a focus on their reproductive capacities – most often they were pregnant, with a foetus as one of the removable pieces. But does this explain the model’s passive, sexualised pose?

Female wax anatomical models were often referred to as ‘Venuses’, after the goddess of love and beauty. Reclining on silk or velvet cushions, in positions copied from works of art, they often had flowing hair and jewellery, which added nothing to their anatomical use. They served to show not just physical differences but also gender differences, as perceived in European culture at that time. A third way of understanding the model is to see the exposed body layers as a symbol of nature ‘unveiling herself’ to the medical gaze. Looking deep into the body was considered to be the route to knowledge.

In just one model, ideas about art, anatomy, gender, flesh and knowledge were all conveyed. So it is not surprising if you have mixed reactions to the model – it was made that way.

via the Science Museum, London

Two of my main gigs are figure modeling and standardized patient-ing.  This is super interesting.

We all (secretly) love the sound of our voice

draculasf:

And now you can love ours, too, because we’re going to be on four gd radio shows.

image

(he’s super excited)

You may listen to us on the following dates and stations:

-Sun 4/27, FCC Free Radio with Melinda Adamsairing 12-2 pm

-Sun 5/11,Radio Valencia’s Bullwinkle’s Whole Wide World Showairing 12-2 pm

For those who are admirers of Radio Valencia, you can, and should, follow them on twitter, too:

Malderor and Dr Junk @HowRadioWorks

Radio Valencia @radiovalenciasf

We will definitely have our Count in on one of these, at least, and I’m not saying that deep, rumbly, smooth voices do much for everyone, but his mwahahaprobably will.

My voice love is definitely no secret.

Doest thou tweet?

draculasf:

If thou doest-eth, perchance you holla at us.

It would behoove thee to follow, cause we’ll have some bitchin’ ticket give-aways anon.

And stuff.

Dracula is the perfect hybrid of Mr Darcy and the Marquis De Sade – ideal husband and depraved sexual mentor in one.

Kittie Klaw interviewed Sex and the séance room.  (via loveage-moondream)

(Source: occultette)